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quantumaniac:

Peter Higgs
Born on May 29th, 1929 - Peter Higgs is best known for his proposal of the Higgs mechanism. Currently he serves as Professor emeritus at the University of Edinburgh.
Higgs’ proposal says that particles were massless when the universe began, and acquired mass a fraction of a second later when interacting with the so-called Higgs field. He postulated that this field permeates all of space, and gives all elementary subatomic particles that interact with it their mass. The Higgs field is thought to interact and cause all of the mass in quarks and leptons, but only causes a tiny portion of the masses of other subatomic particles, such as protons and neutrons. In these larger particles, gluons that bind the quarks together to form them create most of the mass.

quantumaniac:

Peter Higgs

Born on May 29th, 1929 - Peter Higgs is best known for his proposal of the Higgs mechanism. Currently he serves as Professor emeritus at the University of Edinburgh.

Higgs’ proposal says that particles were massless when the universe began, and acquired mass a fraction of a second later when interacting with the so-called Higgs field. He postulated that this field permeates all of space, and gives all elementary subatomic particles that interact with it their mass. The Higgs field is thought to interact and cause all of the mass in quarks and leptons, but only causes a tiny portion of the masses of other subatomic particles, such as protons and neutrons. In these larger particles, gluons that bind the quarks together to form them create most of the mass.

(via pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

In short, though scientists, with their typical hesitation, are saying nothing has been proven, it’s another step closer to knowing that the Higgs boson is real. It’s the last undiscovered particle in the Standard Model, the theory reputed to explain the behavior of particles, which has led to the media to dubbing it the “God particle,” even though scientists resent the name. “I hate that “God particle’ term,” one member of the CERN team in Europe said last December. “The Higgs is not endowed with any religious meaning. It is ridiculous to call it that. Higgs Boson May Be Real, Just Don’t Call It the ‘God Particle’ - Technology - The Atlantic Wire (via fritfilter)

(via jayaprada)

ATLAS and CMS experiments present Higgs search status | CERN Press Release

13 December 2011. In a seminar held at CERN1 today, the ATLAS2 and CMS3 experiments presented the status of their searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. Their results are based on the analysis of considerably more data than those presented at the summer conferences, sufficient to make significant progress in the search for the Higgs boson, but not enough to make any conclusive statement on the existence or non-existence of the elusive Higgs. The main conclusion is that the Standard Model Higgs boson, if it exists, is most likely to have a mass constrained to the range 116-130 GeV by the ATLAS experiment, and 115-127 GeV by CMS. Tantalising hints have been seen by both experiments in this mass region, but these are not yet strong enough to claim a discovery.

Higgs bosons, if they exist, are very short lived and can decay in many different ways. Discovery relies on observing the particles they decay into rather than the Higgs itself. Both ATLAS and CMS have analysed several decay channels, and the experiments see small excesses in the low mass region that has not yet been excluded.

Taken individually, none of these excesses is any more statistically significant than rolling a die and coming up with two sixes in a row. What is interesting is that there are multiple independent measurements pointing to the region of 124 to 126 GeV. It’s far too early to say whether ATLAS and CMS have discovered the Higgs boson, but these updated results are generating a lot of interest in the particle physics community.

“We have restricted the most likely mass region for the Higgs boson to 116-130 GeV, and over the last few weeks we have started to see an intriguing excess of events in the mass range around 125 GeV,” explained ATLAS experiment spokesperson Fabiola Gianotti."This excess may be due to a fluctuation, but it could also be something more interesting. We cannot conclude anything at this stage. We need more study and more data. Given the outstanding performance of the LHC this year, we will not need to wait long for enough data and can look forward to resolving this puzzle in 2012."

"We cannot exclude the presence of the Standard Model Higgs between 115 and 127 GeV because of a modest excess of events in this mass region that appears, quite consistently, in five independent channels," explained CMS experiment Spokesperson, Guido Tonelli. “The excess is most compatible with a Standard Model Higgs in the vicinity of 124 GeV and below but the statistical significance is not large enough to say anything conclusive. As of today what we see is consistent either with a background fluctuation or with the presence of the boson. Refined analyses and additional data delivered in 2012 by this magnificent machine will definitely give an answer.”

Has the Higgs Been Discovered? Physicists Gear Up for Watershed Announcement | Scientific American

The physics buzz reached a frenzy in the past few days over the announcement that the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva is planning to release [on Dec. 13th] what is widely expected to be tantalizing—although not conclusive—evidence for the existence of the Higgs boson, the elementary particle hypothesized to be the origin of the mass of all matter.
Many physicists have already swung into action, swapping rumors about the contents of the announcement and proposing grand ideas about what those rumors would mean, if true. “It’s impossible to be excited enough,” says Gordon Kane, a theoretical physicist at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
The spokespersons of the collaborations using the cathedral-size ATLAS and CMS detectors to search for the Higgs boson and other phenomena at the 27-kilometer-circumference proton accelerator of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are scheduled to present updates December 13 based on analyses of the data collected to date. “There won’t be a discovery announcement, but it does promise to be interesting,” says James Gillies, spokesperson for CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research), which hosts the LHC.

Has the Higgs Been Discovered? Physicists Gear Up for Watershed Announcement | Scientific American

The physics buzz reached a frenzy in the past few days over the announcement that the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva is planning to release [on Dec. 13th] what is widely expected to be tantalizing—although not conclusive—evidence for the existence of the Higgs boson, the elementary particle hypothesized to be the origin of the mass of all matter.

Many physicists have already swung into action, swapping rumors about the contents of the announcement and proposing grand ideas about what those rumors would mean, if true. “It’s impossible to be excited enough,” says Gordon Kane, a theoretical physicist at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

The spokespersons of the collaborations using the cathedral-size ATLAS and CMS detectors to search for the Higgs boson and other phenomena at the 27-kilometer-circumference proton accelerator of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are scheduled to present updates December 13 based on analyses of the data collected to date. “There won’t be a discovery announcement, but it does promise to be interesting,” says James Gillies, spokesperson for CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research), which hosts the LHC.

Endgame for the Higgs Boson

“We are now entering a very exciting phase in the hunt for the Higgs boson,” Sharma said. “If the Higgs boson exists between 114-145 GeV, we should start seeing statistically significant excesses over estimated backgrounds, and if it does not then we hope to rule it out over the entire mass range. One way or the other we are poised for a major discovery, likely by the end of this year.”

(Source: sigma-x)