The American Bear

Sunshine/Lollipops

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
France is signaling willingness to consider a no-fly zone in Syria as the international community increasingly threatens Bashar Al-Assad with military action.
Japanese journalist Mika Yamamoto was shot and killed while reporting in Aleppo. The Japan Press has released her last journalistic footage, showing her with her colleague Kazutaka Sato following the Free Syrian Army.
Medecins Sans Frontières reveals some of their difficult work in a secret northern Syrian field hospital.
Austin Tice, a freelance journalist who has contributed to McClatchy and the Washington Post, is currently missing in Syria.
A photo essay from the fabulously talented Goran Tomasevic of Reuters on his reporting from Syria (warning, graphic). He was also interviewed at the New York Times’ Lens Blog.
NBC’s Richard Engel answered questions about Syria in a live-chat this week.
Syria’s violence is spilling over into Lebanon. Two journalists, Sky News’ Hussein Nahle and Canadian journalist Maria Moore, are among the wounded as a result. 
Algeria’s Lakhdar Brahimi will replace Kofi Annan as Syria’s special envoy.
The State Department’s annual report on foreign terrorism designates so-called “price-tag” attacks by Israelis against Palestinians as acts of terrorism.
Mohammed Morsi’s first exercise of executive power after overturning the army’s is a law barring temporary detentions pending trial for media offenses.
Libya will try Saif al-Islam al-Gaddhafi in country starting next month.
Tunisian journalists in the capital protested the Islamic-led government’s limitations of press freedom.
Many were injured during the Moroccan government’s violent dispersal of a protest held by Rabat’s chapter of the revolutionary February 20 Movement against the royal allegiance ceremony.
A machete-wielding group attacked a village in the coastal region of Kenya, killing 48. The police say it was the result of continued animosity between the region’s Orma and Pokomo groups. 
Ethiopia’s PM Meles Zenawi died. His successor, acting PM Hailemariam Desalegn will remain in place until 2015.
Senegal and the AU have agreed on a special tribunal to try Hissene Habre, the former leader of Chad. 
New reports show that support in Zimbabwe for Morgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change opposition party, signifying a potential strengthening of Mugabe’s party and of resistance to reform.
Three Western hostages in Mali, abducted in late November by Al-Qaeda militants, are pleading for their freedom.
Bahraini activist Nabeel Rajab’s conviction has been overturned, but he remains in jail.
Iran is reportedly expanding on its underground nuclear capacity. It has also revealed a number of new defense projects, including an updated short-range missile.
Ban Ki-Moon will attend the meeting of the Non-Aligned Movement in Iran.
The 2,000th soldier was killed in the war in Afghanistan with the death of Specialist James A. Justice, at a military hospital in Germany. It took nine years of war to reach the first 1,000 and only 27 months for the second. Check out the New York Times’ Faces of the Dead interactive.  (And how do they get to that calculation?)
Check out some of the National Post’s Richard Johnson’s sketch drawings of Canadians in Kandahar.
The Pentagon has recommended that Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford replace General John Allen as the commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan.
Those insider attacks, the green-on-blue attacks by Afghan soldiers against NATO forces, are of heightened concern.
Pakistan lodged its first formal protest with the US over drone strikes.
The mystery disappearance (from the Internet) of beloved Pakistani Twitter satirist @MajorlyProfound is causing upset.
China is pushing thousands of Kachin refugees back across the border into Myanmar, where they fled ethnic fighting.
The US is moving toward bolstering missile defense in the Asia-Pacific.
Mass killer Anders Breivik of Norway has been sentenced to 21 years in prison. 
The work of secret Demographics Unit of the NYPD, which spent the last six years spying on Muslim neighborhoods, has not once led to a lead on a terrorist case. 
WNYC interviewed Janice Fedarcyk, the retiring NY field boss for the FBI, and the highest ranking woman in her field.
Lots of interest and uproar over the news that a Navy SEAL is pseudonymously publishing a blow-by-blow account of the takedown of Osama bin Laden, to be released on September 11th. Any hoped for anonymity is gone, though. The (now ex-)SEAL has been named as Matt Bissonnette.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign upthrough this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Aleppo, Syria. A dramatic mid-fight photo by Goran Tomasevic of Reuters. 

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign upthrough this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Aleppo, Syria. A dramatic mid-fight photo by Goran Tomasevic of Reuters.